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  • "Where did you copy-paste it from?" 3 ways to wean schoolchildren and students from plagiarism
    Due to the development of technology and distance education, the percentage of plagiarism in educational papers has increased significantly. Moreover, schoolchildren and students themselves often cannot understand the limits of permissible borrowing. Is it possible with such inputs to wean them from copy-paste? The California State University team thinks so, and suggests 3 ways to do it.
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the transition of education to a remote format, many schools and universities are faced with an increase in the percentage of borrowing in the work of schoolchildren and students. Richmond State University reported a threefold increase in plagiarism compared to last year, and the University of Georgia saw a 50% increase in plagiarism. According to representatives of educational institutions, due to the transfer of educational work to home conditions, where no one controls what the student used during work, the boundaries of what is acceptable were significantly blurred. Many managed to write off the same essays and as a result it ended very sadly. If they could use https://editius.com/edit-my-paper/ while at home, many problems could be avoided. Thus, not solving the problem of cheating can, as a result, be very deplorable for the development of independent thinking in a child.
    Ask them to tell you why they plagiarize
    In a study by the Josephson Institute's Center for Youth Ethics, one in three students admitted to using online content to complete academic assignments. In 2012, 92% of students admitted to cheating in one way or another from other people's work during the school year. The researchers concluded that whether students knowingly violated academic rules or acted because of their inability to work with sources, simply catching people plagiarizing with computer programs was not enough to solve the problem.
    "Where did you copy-paste it from?" 3 ways to wean schoolchildren and students from plagiarism Due to the development of technology and distance education, the percentage of plagiarism in educational papers has increased significantly. Moreover, schoolchildren and students themselves often cannot understand the limits of permissible borrowing. Is it possible with such inputs to wean them from copy-paste? The California State University team thinks so, and suggests 3 ways to do it. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the transition of education to a remote format, many schools and universities are faced with an increase in the percentage of borrowing in the work of schoolchildren and students. Richmond State University reported a threefold increase in plagiarism compared to last year, and the University of Georgia saw a 50% increase in plagiarism. According to representatives of educational institutions, due to the transfer of educational work to home conditions, where no one controls what the student used during work, the boundaries of what is acceptable were significantly blurred. Many managed to write off the same essays and as a result it ended very sadly. If they could use https://editius.com/edit-my-paper/ while at home, many problems could be avoided. Thus, not solving the problem of cheating can, as a result, be very deplorable for the development of independent thinking in a child. Ask them to tell you why they plagiarize In a study by the Josephson Institute's Center for Youth Ethics, one in three students admitted to using online content to complete academic assignments. In 2012, 92% of students admitted to cheating in one way or another from other people's work during the school year. The researchers concluded that whether students knowingly violated academic rules or acted because of their inability to work with sources, simply catching people plagiarizing with computer programs was not enough to solve the problem.
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  • Critical Race Theory Collides with the Law
    K–12 schools across the https://google.com/ country are rushing to incorporate critical race theory and intersectionality into their curricula and pedagogy. Critical race theory maintains that racism is entrenched in American society and that the law works to consolidate and sustain white supremacy and privilege. Intersectionality holds that race, gender, class, religion, and other characteristics are related and confer advantages on people if they are in the dominant group and disadvantages if they are not. A white Muslim woman, for instance, would enjoy privileges because of her race but might experience oppression because of her gender and religion.

    Last year in Raleigh, North Carolina, the Wake County Public Schools held a teachers conference promoting these ideas and their application in schools. One session, “Whiteness in Ed Spaces,” advised teachers to “challenge the dominant ideology” of whiteness and to fight back when parents objected. In Loudon County, Virginia, when parents did object to the district promoting critical race theory, a Facebook group of parents and teachers who supported the practice said they should “infiltrate” groups who opposed critical race theory and use hackers to “either shut down their websites or redirect them to pro-CRT/anti-racist informational webpages.”

    As school districts continue to infuse critical race theory into their curricula, they might confront another obstacle: the law. One charter school, Democracy Prep in Las Vegas, Nevada, is learning that the hard way. In December, William Clark, a senior at Democracy Prep, sued the school, alleging that it gave him a failing grade in his “Sociology of Change” course and threatened to prevent him from graduating because he refused to confess his privilege openly as demanded by the school, the course curriculum, and the teacher.
    Critical Race Theory Collides with the Law K–12 schools across the https://google.com/ country are rushing to incorporate critical race theory and intersectionality into their curricula and pedagogy. Critical race theory maintains that racism is entrenched in American society and that the law works to consolidate and sustain white supremacy and privilege. Intersectionality holds that race, gender, class, religion, and other characteristics are related and confer advantages on people if they are in the dominant group and disadvantages if they are not. A white Muslim woman, for instance, would enjoy privileges because of her race but might experience oppression because of her gender and religion. Last year in Raleigh, North Carolina, the Wake County Public Schools held a teachers conference promoting these ideas and their application in schools. One session, “Whiteness in Ed Spaces,” advised teachers to “challenge the dominant ideology” of whiteness and to fight back when parents objected. In Loudon County, Virginia, when parents did object to the district promoting critical race theory, a Facebook group of parents and teachers who supported the practice said they should “infiltrate” groups who opposed critical race theory and use hackers to “either shut down their websites or redirect them to pro-CRT/anti-racist informational webpages.” As school districts continue to infuse critical race theory into their curricula, they might confront another obstacle: the law. One charter school, Democracy Prep in Las Vegas, Nevada, is learning that the hard way. In December, William Clark, a senior at Democracy Prep, sued the school, alleging that it gave him a failing grade in his “Sociology of Change” course and threatened to prevent him from graduating because he refused to confess his privilege openly as demanded by the school, the course curriculum, and the teacher.
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